June 26, 2017

Prenatal Fish Oil – Lower Risk of Asthma in Children

Prenatal Fish Oil Supplementation May Lower Risk of Asthma in Children

Taking fish oil supplements during pregnancy may lower the risk of asthma in children, according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study shows that supplementation with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during the third trimester can reduce the risk of asthma or persistent wheeze in the babies. LCPUFA supplementation also reduces the risk of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in the offspring.

Pregnant woman

Asthma in Children is a Significant Problem

Asthma is a common problem in children born in the United States. Approximately 7.4 percent of adults and 8.6 percent of children in the nation have asthma, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), and the number of children with the breathing disorder has been increasing since the 1980s.

Hospitalization rates for asthma are historically higher in the Northeast. Massachusetts has the highest prevalence rate for asthma at 12 percent, according to statistics presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with several other northeastern states following with asthma prevalence rates topping 10 percent.

Fish Oil-Derived LCPUFAs in Pregnancy and Asthma in Offspring

Reduced intake of LCPUFAs may contribute to the increased incidence of wheezing and asthma in children. The researchers in the NEJM study hoped to evaluate the effects of maternal LCPUFA supplementation on offspring.

The scientists enrolled 736 pregnant women at 24 weeks of gestation into the study then randomly assigned the subjects to control and test Asthma-prenatal-fish-oil-frank-magliochetti-report-healthcaregroups. Participants in the test group received 2.4 g of n−3 LCPUFA derived from fish oil each day, while those in the control group took a placebo containing olive oil daily.

The participants’ offspring became the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) cohort. The researchers followed this group of children for several years, with pediatricians collecting clinical data for visits at 1 week after birth, and then at 1, 3, 6 months and every 6 months until the children reached 36 months of age. The pediatricians then saw the children yearly until the participants were 5 years old.

Neither the researchers nor the participants knew which group the children belonged to for the first three years of follow-up studies. During the next two years of follow-up studies, only the scientists were unaware of the group assignments.

The researchers looked primarily for persistent wheezing and asthma, but included LRTIs, eczema, asthma exacerbations, and allergic sensitization as secondary endpoints.

Ninety-five percent of the 695 children included in the COPSAC cohort completed the 3-year, double-blind follow-up portion of the study. The researchers found that the risk of asthma or persistent wheeze in the treatment group receiving LCPUFA was 16.9 percent, while the risk was 23.7 percent in the control group. This means consuming fish oil-derived LCPUFAs can lower the risk of persistent wheeze or asthma and LRTIs in offspring by nearly 7 percentage points, or one-third. Analysis of the secondary endpoints showed that supplementation reduces the risk of LRTIs, but there was no association between supplementation and asthma exacerbations, allergic sensitization, or eczema.

These findings would be extremely helpful for expectant mothers hoping to reduce the risk of asthma and other breathing problems in their children.

Source

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1503734

http://www.aafa.org/page/asthma-facts.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12214899

https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/most_recent_data_states.htm

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release new sites dedicated to the industry. Frank currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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NSAIDs May Prevent Colorectal Cancer

NSAIDs May Prevent the Development of Colorectal Cancer after Polyp Removal

A recent study published in the British medical journal suggests that NSAIDs may help prevent colorectal cancer after polyp removal – This post goes into more detail on the study.

Frank Magliochetti

Taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may prevent the recurrence of advanced neoplasia, a type of polyp that is the precursor of colorectal cancer, after the surgical removal of pre-existing polyps. Recurrence rates of benign polyps and advanced neoplasia are quite high, so clinicians are eager to find easy-to-follow treatments to reduce recurrence.frankmagliochettireport-healthcare-cancer-treatments

A team of scientists from across the United States recently collaborated with Mayo Clinic researchers to determine how well NSAIDs, aspirin and other supplements prevent the recurrence of precancerous or cancerous polyps. The results of the study, published in the British medical journal BMJ suggest NSAIDs may offer the greatest protection.

About Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in men and woman in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among cancers affecting both men and women.

Colorectal cancer, characterized by abnormal cell growth in the colon or rectum, is one of the few preventable types of cancers. Removing precancerous polyps during colonoscopy prevents those polyps from turning cancerous but it does not prevent recurrence of advanced neoplasia, also known as advanced adenomas or adenomatous polyps. A study published in PLOS showed a recurrence rate of 50.5 percent for polyps, and a 32.9 percent recurrence rate for neoplasia.

Research Suggests Non-Aspirin NSAIDs Reduces Risk of Recurrence of Precancerous Polyps

The results of the BMJ study showed that non-aspirin NSAIDs, particularly ibuprofen, work better than aspirin or many other nutritional supplements for most patients when it came to preventing the growth of advanced neoplasia. The researchers note that, because most colorectal cancers develop from neoplasia, frank-magliochetti-report-healthcare-cancer-preventionchemoprevention with NSAIDs has a favorable risk to benefit profile when it comes to reducing recurrence in those with a history of high-risk neoplasia.

  1. Hassan Murad, M.D., preventive medicine physician and clinical epidemiologist at Mayo Clinic, is the study’s senior author. “Approximately 85 percent of all colorectal cancers are thought to result from untreated adenomatous polyps,” says Murad, M.D., in a press release published by Mayo Clinic. “If we can find a way to stop their growth, we could prevent a majority of these cases.”

“We knew that aspirin and other NSAIDs have a protective effect, and that a number of other nutritional supplements have also been studied for their effectiveness in preventing cancer,” says Dr. Murad. “What we didn’t know is how they compared to each other.”

The research team conducted a meta-analysis from data obtained from 15 randomized control trials. The scientists reviewed information from 12,234 patients who were taking various supplements and medications. The researchers looked at low- and high-dose aspirin therapy, NSAIDs, vitamin D, calcium, and folic acid, and then compared each treatment alone and in different combinations.

Analysis of the information showed that non-aspirin NSAIDs worked better than all the other therapies for preventing adenomatous polyps recurrence within three to five years after removal through colonoscopy. Because these non-aspirin NSAIDs pose other health risks, this treatment may not be appropriate for all patients.

“It is important that patients and doctors have a discussion on the various risks and benefits of any medication or other therapy,” says Murad. “While a research publication may contain promising findings, it is generalized information, and each individual is different. So their care will be individualized, as well.”

Source

http://www.bmj.com/content/355/bmj.i6188

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0050990

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release new sites dedicated to the industry. Frank currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Spending Trends: Health Care for Children

Spending Trends 1996 – 2013: Health Care for Children

Spending on health care for children has risen in the past 20 years and a new article sheds light on where the money goes.

Frank Magliochetti

Personal health care spending for children skyrocketed 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, according to a new study published online by JAMA Pediatrics. Increased spending in health care for children reflects the increased spending for patients of all ages, according to the statistics presented by frankmaglochetti_healthcare-report-trendsthe Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). The United States spent about $3.2 trillion for health care in 2015, or $9,990 per person, up 5.8 percent from the year before.

Spending Trends for Children’s Personal Health Care in the U.S., 1996 – 2013

While health care spending on children continues to rise, there is very little data on differences in spending for specific conditions, age groups, gender, and type of care. There is also a paucity of information on how spending patterns have changed over the years. To shed light on these spending patterns, Joseph L. Dieleman, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, Seattle, and his team of researchers used 183 sources of data and 2.9 billion patient records gathered from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation Disease Expenditure 2013 project database. They performed annual estimates for each year from 1996 through 2013 and used inflation-adjusted 2015 dollars to report estimates.

They found that spending for pediatric health care increased from $149.6 billion in 1996 to $233.5 billion in 2013. Spending per child rose from $1,915 in 1996 to $2,777 in 2013.

frankmagliochetti_report-trends-childrenhealthcareMost of the money went for well-newborn care in inpatient settings, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and well-dental care. Payers spent $27.9 billion for inpatient well-newborn care, which was the largest condition leading to health care spending.

ADHD and well-dental care services were the second and third largest conditions leading to health care spending in children, with $20.6 billion for ADHD care and $18.2 billion for well-dental care. At $9 billion, asthma care garnered the fourth highest level of spending.

The researchers found that, at $11,741, the greatest spending per child was for infants younger than 1 year in 2013. Spending per child increased over time, rising from $1915 in 1996 to $2777 in 2013. Ambulatory care among all types of care and inpatient well-newborn care, ADHD, and asthma showed the greatest growth.

Just over 30 percent of total children’s health care went for inpatient care, 38.6 percent went towards ambulatory care, and 7.8 percent was spent on retail pharmaceuticals in 2013. More was spent on males than on females.childrenhealthcarecosts-frank-magliochetti

The findings provide information about spending trends for child health care and serve as a guide for future spending. Payers can expect larger health care spending growth rates for inpatient well-newborn care and ADHD, for example, while health care professionals can gear up to provide an increased amount of care for these conditions.

“The next step should be analyzing the factors driving increased health care spending and determining whether changes in particular subcategories of spending have been associated with improvements in processes or outcomes. It is crucial to understand whether spending increases have been appropriate or misguided and how we might target spending increases and reductions now and in the future,” the authors conclude in a press release.

Source

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2593700

https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/NationalHealthExpendData/downloads/highlights.pdf

http://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/how-much-money-is-spent-on-kids-health-care-where-does-it-go/

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release new sites dedicated to the industry. Frank currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Rising Drug Costs: Trending 2017

2017 Trends: Rising Drug Costs

The cost of prescription drugs has been rising rapidly since 2010, and will likely continue to rise in 2017.

Frank Magliochetti

The largest drug maker in the United States, Pfizer Inc., raised prices on 133 of its U.S. brand name products in 2015. More than three-quarters of the increases were 10 percent or more. Daraprim, the antiparasitic commonly used to treat toxoplasmosis, went from $13.50 to $750 per pill overnight in September of 2015. The price of Epipens skyrocketed 500 percent, rising from $97 in 2007 to $600 in 2016 for a two-pack set of the emergency treatment for anaphylaxis.

The total net spending on prescription drugs has grown to $309.5 billion annually, according to IMS Health, including discounts, within the past year. This makes prescription drugs the fastest growing segment of the nation’s healthcare economy. At 12.2 percent, 2014 spending on drugs dwarfs the overall frank-magliochetti-2017-medical-trendsgrowth rate of healthcare spending and the rate of spending growth on physician and hospital care. The price of drugs, rather than utilization, is the predominant driving factor in this increased drug spending.

Spending on drugs rose 8.5 percent in 2015 but total prescriptions dispensed increased by a mere 1 percent. The pharmaceutical price inflation was 7.2 percent in 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Producer Price Index (PPI), significantly outpacing both general inflation and medical inflation at 0.7 percent and 2.7 percent, respectively.

2017 Trends towards Higher Prices

2017 will probably see more increases in drug prices, and the rises costs will likely have a significant effect on consumers and healthcare providers. Price hikes will likely affect employees and young retirees in 2017. The results of Segal’s 2017 Health Plan Cost Trend Survey suggest prescription drug costs will rise 11.6 percent in 2017 for active employees and retirees under the age of 65, on top of 11.3 percent in 2016.

That is a huge leap for most Americans. More than 48 percent of all people living in the U.S. reportcdc-frankmagliochettireport taking at least one prescription drug in the previous month, according to statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and more than 20 percent of Americans use three or more prescription medications. Health plan cost trends have slowed, according to the Segal survey, but they continue to outpace average wage increases and inflation by more than three time.

Patients carry an increasingly heavy financial burden when it comes to drug costs, and so do hospitals faced with difficult decisions regarding the allocation of scarce resources. Inpatient drug spending rose 23.4 percent on average, according to a report by theAmerican Hospital Association (AHA), and 38.6 percent per individual hospital admission. The report details the experience of one hospital that reported that last year’s price increases for just four common drugs were equivalent to the annual salaries of 55 full-time nurses there. Drug prices will likely continue to rise in unpredictable ways while reimbursement amounts from payors will probably increase only a small amount. Hospitals will continue the struggle of balancing resources in response to changes in the drug market.

The rise in specialty drug/biotech medications will be especially high in 2017 at 18.7 percent. While specialty drugs make up less than 1 percent of all medications, the 100 insurance providers responding to the Segal’s survey said that specialty drugs now account for 35 percent of total projected prescription drug cost increases for the next year.

Source

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-10-02/pfizer-raised-prices-on-133-drugs-this-year-and-it-s-not-alone

http://www.imshealth.com/en/about-us/news/ims-health-study-us-drug-spending-growth-reaches-8.5-percent-in-2015

http://www.bls.gov/ppi/ppidr201512.pdf

https://www.segalco.com/media/2716/me-trend-survey-2017.pdf

http://www.aha.org/content/16/aha-fah-rx-report.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/drug-use-therapeutic.htm

 

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release new sites dedicated to the industry  – .  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Shingles on the Rise

Shingles on the Rise

Shingles is increasing in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and health experts are not quite sure why.
A recent retrospective study of 2,848,765 Medicare claims showed the incidence of shingles increased 39 percent from 1992 to 2010.
About Shingles
shingles_frankmagliochettireportNearly a third people in the U.S. will develop shingles, otherwise known as herpes zoster or simply “zoster,” during their lifetime. While most people who get shingles will develop it only once but some get the disease two or three times. The risk of shingles increases with age, especially after the age of 50. Children can get shingles, but it is uncommon.
Signs and symptoms of shingles include pain, itching, or tingling of skin just before the development of a painful rash of blister-like sores. Symptoms typically develop on one side of the body, often on the face or torso. Fever, headache, chills, and upset stomach may occur. Severe pain in the affected area, known as postherpatic neuralgia (PHN), is the most common symptom of shingles.
Shingles develops as the result of exposure to the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which is the same virus that causes varicella disease, also known as chickenpox. The virus remains dormant sensory ganglia after the individual recovers from varicella; the virus can reactivate to cause shingles years later.
Are Chickenpox Vaccinations Accelerating the Increase of Shingles?
Researchers are still working to understand why the virus reactivates. It appears that an individual’s risk for shingles increases as immunity to VZV declines, as happens with aging or with the development of immunodeficiency associated with certain illnesses or treatments.
Some research suggests that exposure to varicella disease can actually boost immunity to VZV and reduce the risk for reactivation as shingles. Other research does not show this effect and the results “reflects the uncertain influence of varicella circulation on zoster epidemiology.”
Rates of chickenpox fell dramatically in the years following the implementation of the childhood varicella vaccination program in 1996, leading some scientists to speculate that the rise in shingles in adults was the result of childhood vaccination against varicella. These researchers reasoned that adults exposed to children with the virus would build immunity against varicella, and that widespread vaccination of children would provide fewer opportunities for adult exposure.
Results from a recent CDC study seem to disprove this theory. Researchers in that study used Medicare data from 1992 to 2010 and found that shingles rates shingles_frankmagliochetti-reportwere rising even before the introduction of the varicella vaccine in 1996. Furthermore, zoster rates did not accelerate after the introduction of the program.
The researchers in the CDC study also looked for any link between state varicella vaccination coverage and zoster rates, and found that the rates of shingles did not accelerate as states increased vaccination coverage. In fact, the incidence of shingles was the same in states with high vaccination coverage as it was in states with low coverage.
Furthermore, countries without routine varicella vaccination programs are experiencing similar increases in shingles rates in adults.
Like the wild-type virus that occurs in nature, the attenuated vaccine virus can reactivate to cause shingles. Children who get the varicella vaccine appear to have a much lower risk for childhood shingles than children infected with the wild-type virus. Vaccinated children are also less likely to be infected with the wild-type virus, which is more likely to reactivate as shingles as compared to the weakened vaccine virus.
While scientists have yet to discover the reasons behind the increased incidence of shingles, it is clear that zoster vaccination can prevent many cases of shingles, both in adults and in children.

Source
http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/surveillance.html
http://annals.org/aim/article/1784289/examination-links-between-herpes-zoster-incidence-childhood-varicella-vaccination
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12057605
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2866606/
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00039897.htm
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21217180

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Top Prescription Drugs Purchases and Trends of 2016

Top Prescription Drugs Purchases and Trends of 2016

Nearly half of all Americans take at least one prescription drug each day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the cost of many of the most popular and most important medications is rising.
risingprescriptioncosts_frankmagliochettiThe Price for Prescription Drugs is Rising
Each of the past three years have seen double-digit price increases, including average rises of 12.6 percent in 2014 and over 10 percent in 2015. The average price for prescription drugs has increased an average of 10 percent in the past year. Despite pushback from insurers, scrutiny from lawmakers and outcry from consumers, many pharmaceutical companies plan to increase the price of prescription drugs.
Prescription drug spending in the United States totaled about $457 billion in 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), accounting for 16.7 percent of all U.S. health care spending. In the 1990s, only about 7 percent of health care spending went towards prescription drugs.
A Wall Street Journal analysis found that prices for 30 prescription drugs increased at eight times the rate of inflation, with an average price hike of 76 percent from 2010 to 2014. Retail prices for some commonly used prescription drugs increased faster than general inflation each year from 2006 to 2013, according to AARP, which translates into an annual cost of therapy of more than $11,000 for a consumer who takes a prescription medication regularly. The total was nearly three-quarters of the average Social Security retirement benefit of $15,526, almost half the median income of a person on Medicare, and nearly one-fifth of the median U.S. household income.
Most Common Prescriptions and Average Cost by State
SearchRx compiled a list of the average costs of prescription drugs by state. At an average price of $12.82 per prescription, Mississippi tops the list as the US state with the lowest average per prescription cost. Arkansas was also low at $12.93, followed by Virginia at $13.90 and Louisiana at $13.10. Hawaii was the most expensive state to fill a prescription, at an average of $19.47, followed by North Dakota at $19.07, Alaska at $18.96 per prescription, and Delaware at $18.51.

The website also lists the most commonly prescribed medications last year:
1. Atorvastatin Calcium (generic for Lipitor) – lowers cholesterol and reduces risk of heart attack, stroke, and other complications in patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other risk factors
2. Levothyroxine (generic for Synthroid) – primary use is for the treatment of hypothyroidism but it is also used to treat or prevent goiter
3. Lisinopril (generic for Prinivil) – for hypertension or congestive heart failure
4. Omeprazole (generic for Prilosec) – treats symptoms of GERD
5. Metformin (generic for Glucophage) – improves blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes
6. Amlodipine (generic for Norvasc) – for hypertension or anginafrank-magliochetti-report-drug-pricing
7. Simvastatin (generic for Zocor) – lowers cholesterol and triglycerides
8. Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen (generic for Lortab) – relieves moderate to moderately severe pain
9. Metoprolol ER (generic for Toprol XL) – treats angina and hypertension
10. Losartan (generic for Cozaar) – treats hypertension and reduces the risk of stroke in those with heart disease
SearchRx also ranked pharmacy chains in order of least expensive to most expensive. Walmart was the least expensive, followed by Target, “other,” Rite Aid, and CVS. Walgreens was the most expensive on the list.
If current trends continue, 2017 will see higher prescription prices, increased health premiums, and continued increases in the number of Americans who take prescription drugs every day.
Source
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/drug-use-therapeutic.htm

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/01/11/prescription-drug-prices-jumped-more-than-10-percent-in-2015/

http://time.com/money/4406167/prescription-drug-prices-increase-why/

https://aspe.hhs.gov/pdf-report/observations-trends-prescription-drug-spending

http://www.wsj.com/articles/for-prescription-drug-makers-price-increases-drive-revenue-1444096750

http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/ppi/2016-02/RX-Price-Watch-Trends-in-Retail-Prices-Prescription-Drugs-Widely-Used-by-Older-Americans.pdf

https://www.searchrx.com/blog/2016-prescription-prices-and-purchase-trends/

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Tdap Lead to Increased Trend in HPV Vaccines

Requiring Tdap May Increase HPV Vaccination in Adolescent Girls

About 9 in 10 people will get a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection at some point in their lives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). HPV infections are associated with health problems, including several types of cancer in men and women, which means HPV infection is an urgent health problem. A new study shows that teenage girls were more likely to start the HPV vaccine series in states where schools required the meningococcal vaccine and/or the tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) booster prior to admission.
frankmagliochetti_tdap-vaccineNationwide, 63 percent of girls have received at least one dose of the vaccine, and half of all boys have started the series. Low HPV vaccination coverage is an urgent public health problem and improving HPV vaccination rates will save lives. The nation’s high Tdap vaccination rate of 86 percent shows that high HPV vaccination coverage is possible.
Most cervical cancers, anal carcinomas, and oropharyngeal cancers are the result of infection with high-risk HPV strains. While vaccines capable of preventing HPV related cancers are available, low usage limits their utility.
Previous attempts at improving HPV vaccination included state laws requiring the vaccine, but many of these laws allowed for exemptions for any reason. Because parents could opt out for nearly any reason, these state laws have been largely ineffective at increasing HPV vaccination coverage.
Improving HPV Vaccination Coverage by Vaccinating Against Other Diseases
To identify policies that could improve suboptimal HPV vaccination rates, the authors of the study sought to evaluate the relationship between adolescent vaccination and states’ school entry requirements. In the study, published in the medical journal Pediatrics, researchers compared HPV vaccination coverage in teenage girls aged 13 to 17 years across states with different vaccination requirements for school entry.
The authors gathered information from published data regarding school entry requirements from the Immunization Action Coalition (2007-2012) and vaccination rates from the National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen, 2008-2012). They analyzed Tdap booster and meningococcal vaccination rates and evaluated the possibility of increasing HPV vaccination rates by “spillover effect,” meaning schools that require vaccinations as a condition of attendance could have higher rates of HPV vaccination.

The Results

The researchers found that requiring vaccination for admission to school did indeed improve vaccination rates for HPV. Vaccination requirements also boostedfrankmagliochettireport__hpv_vaccine coverage for Tdap and meningococcal vaccinations.
Compared with other states, those states with Tdap booster and meningococcal vaccination had a 22 and 24 percentage point increases in coverage for these vaccines, respectively. States with HPV vaccination requirements had less than 1 percentage point increase in coverage. Requiring Tdap booster and meningococcal vaccinations caused an 8 and 4 percentage point spillover increases for HPV vaccination coverage.
The study was limited in that it failed to account for confounding variables, such as religion, ethnicity, and parental education. Furthermore, the study did not account for the types of school attended, as homeschooled adolescents and teens attending private schools may not be subject to the same vaccination requirements. Despite these limitations and considering the controversy surrounding HPV legislation, utilizing the spillover effect from meningococcal and Tdap vaccination may be an effective approach to improving HPV vaccination coverage.

SOURCE:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/vaccines/hpv-vaccine.html

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2016/11/05/peds.2016-1414?sso=1&sso_redirect_count=1&nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token

http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/infographics/vacc-coverage.html

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Smart Tech: Wearable Medical Devices

Smart Tech:  Wearable Medical Devices 2017 – 2020

Smart technologies will continue to drive the ever-growing medical wearable device market in 2017 and well into the future.
The global medical wearable devices market topped $3.2 billion in revenue in 2015, according to Mordor Intelligence, which expects the market to surpass $7.9 billion in 2020 as the industry continues to grow at a healthy CAGR of 19.8 percent during that period.
wearablemedicaldevices_frank-magliochetti-reportWearable medical devices, known simply as “wearables,” are small pieces of equipment featuring sensors that attach to the body. These sensors detect and monitor changes in specific body signatures produced by various body systems and organs. Early wearable technology allowed consumers to monitor vital signs. Today’s wearables allow users to monitor food intake, activity, and sleep levels. Tomorrow’s devices may provide continuous monitoring of glucose levels, smart clothing for infants, and smart EKG necklaces for those with heart problems.
Wearables have the potential to fill a number of applications in remote patient monitoring, sports and fitness monitoring, and home healthcare. Simplified usage of these devices, coupled with the ability to synchronize with smartphones and tables, assisted growth in this segment.
Global Wearable Devices Market- Market Dynamics

There are immense potential socio-economics of wearable medical devices for multiple sectors. Fitness devices that encourage the users to exercise can significantly reduce healthcare costs, for example.

Investors are focusing on a wide variety of projects, ranging from downloadable apps to improving the size, cost and sensitivity of sensors.wearablemedicaldevices_frankmagliochettireport

Several factors propel the growth of the global wearable market. Technological innovation is perhaps the most important factor, as these advancements lead to the introduction of new products.
Diabetes and other chronic diseases are rising at a seemingly uncontrollable rate. Wearable devices will play an increasingly important role in helping doctors and patients manage chronic diseases.

Developers make wearable devices easier to use and simplify interpretation of the data collected. Simplicity encourages use.
Market penetration of smartphones, smart watches and other wearable devices will promote the use of wearable medical technology. These devices have already penetrated the market deeply, with the worldwide smart watch shipments reaching about 25 million in 2015.

Some factors, such as reimbursement issues and high device cost, will restrain the medical wearables market somewhat but the effect should be minimal, as demand should remain high.
Several companies are already exploiting the growing interest in medical wearable technology by creating affordable products that offer high value to users and their healthcare partners.

Some of the key players already operating in the medical wearable device market include:
• Dräger
• Fitbit Inc.
• Intelesens Ltd.
• Lifewatch AG
• Omron Corporation
• Polar Electro
• Philips Electronics
• Withings SAS
These wearable manufacturers will likely improve hardware in existing products and create sturdier devices within the next few years. Hardware and device ifrankmagliochettireport_wearable-medical-devicesnnovations may include larger and easier to read displays, extended battery life, waterproof hardware, and compatibility with GPS and other sensors included in a standard smart phone. Software innovations may include advanced monitoring systems and improved patient care software, such as breathing exercises and on-demand nutrition counseling.
The wearable market is expanding because the devices are autonomous, which makes them easy to use, and non-invasive. It is also growing because of its ability to help prevent and manage chronic diseases.

Source
https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/global-wearable-medical-device-market-industry

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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2017 Trends in Cancer Care Drugs

2017 Trends in Cancer Care Drugs

Frank Magliochetti Report

Cancer drug development will continue to be a key focus area in 2017. While the number of new cancer frank-magliochettireport_2017_cancer-stopcases in the United States each year remains constant at about 1.7 million, the American Cancer Society says that the cancer death rate has plummeted 23 percent since the early 1990s. This is largely due to improved diagnostics, early detection, and new medications and treatments.
There has been extensive development of cancer medications in the past decade, and the development of oncology drugs will continue to be a key focus area in 2017. There are several important factors affecting cancer drug development in the upcoming year, including a large number of clinical trials already underway, the possibility of shortened regulatory approval time, and increases to consumer cost.

Cancer Drug Development

Extensive development of cancer medications is already underway, and much of this development will continue into 2017. New medicines, just launched within the past five years, now treat more than 20 types of tumors, according to a new report from IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. In fact, there were 70 new oncology treatments for more than 20 uses launched from 2011 to 2015. Further research of these new agents will likely result in approval for subsequent indications and provide therapeutic options to more patients.2017_cancertrends_frankmagliochetti
While there is substantial opportunity in the cancer drug industry, there will also be stiff competition in 2017. More than 500 companies are actively engaged in developing oncology drugs. Collectively, these companies are pursuing nearly 600 indications, primarily for non-small cell lung cancer, breast, prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers.
This giant and diverse group of pharma companies has created a healthy pipeline of oncology drugs in clinical development. In fact, the pipeline of cancer drugs in clinical development has grown more than 60 percent over the past ten years.
Nearly 90 percent of these drugs are targeted agents, and the trend towards targeted agents will likely continue. There are more than 120 clinical development project underway for targeted agents to treat non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, for example, and each features different mechanisms and combinations that promise new benefits.
It is taking less time for new cancer treatments to receive regulatory approval. The median time from patent filing to approval for cancer drugs in the U.S. dropped from 10.25 years in 2013 to 9.5 years in 2015. Initiatives such as the FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation expedite development and review of drugs that treat serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions.

Patient Costs may Rise

In campaign speeches, the new President-elect of the United States has promised changes to the Affordable Care Act, and these changes may increase patient costs. Average treatment costs for a year of cancer care for patients with commercial insurance plans rose 19 percent to $58,097 in 2014.  Cost increases in 2017 may depend on where the patient receives care. Outpatient services account for more than half of the total costs, according to the IMS report, and the average combined total cost of all  drugs used by the patient accounts for 28 percent of the total cost of care.
Average costs for administering cancer drugs are usually twice as high when patients receive treatment in hospital outpatient settings than when they receive care in physician offices. Higher costs for outpatient care increases patient cost responsibility. Coupons and other forms of assistance may offset the cost to consumers.

Source

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21332/abstract
https://morningconsult.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/IMS-Institute-Global-Oncology-Report-05.31.16.pdf

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

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Genome Editing – Progressing Trend

The Rush for Genome Editing

Frank Magliochetti Report

The Rush for Genome Editing

Gene-editing technology has sparked a frenzy of competitors fueled to develop the first of what may be thousands of treatments for genetic disorders.

From science fiction of movies like Jurassic Park to the reality of GMO foods, the concept of customizing plants, animals and even human genomes has mesmerized our imagination and culture for decades. This obsession is not surprising considering the remarkable impact of genetic engineering on our lives, and the promise it may hold for our future.crispr-genome-editing-franlmagliochetti-report_northandoverma

Modifying the genes of an organism is no easy task. It’s not as simple as removing the parts you do not like with an eraser. It involves making changes at a molecular level that are both complex and challenging.

One concern among scientists is the modifications made in human germline cells – i.e. the sperm or the egg. These are genetic changes that would actually be passed on through generations and the fear is that there could be unexpected side effects. Couple that with the ethical concerns of people misusing this technology to intentionally modify the genome to make “designer babies” with enhanced characteristics. These are some real concerns that are causing scientists to pause and weigh the pros and cons of use of this technology.

More and more companies are racing to stay ahead of the trend and become the leaders in the field.

In Cambridge MA, Intellia Therapeutics Inc. has a 65,000 square foot build out underway, however, it is still planning to functioning while under construction.

Intellia is one of a trio of startups in the Cambridge area working locally in the biotech niche known as CRISPR-Cas9. The gene-editing technology was frank-magliochetti-report_intelliadiscovered just four years ago.

Drug development historically has been a slow process – it often takes more than a decade to bring a medicine from lab to marketplace. But that’s changing, thanks to new machines that can screen drug targets faster and an entrepreneurial environment that’s more akin to high-tech than Big Pharma.frankmagliochettireport_genome_editing

Intellia has high-profile collaboration deals with Swiss drug giant Novartis AG and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Tarrytown, N.Y. It raised $108 million in an initial public offering in May. Their scientists are working on gene-editing treatments for everything including the hepatitis B virus to a rare form of blindness. If all goes well, it could move its earliest drug candidates into clinical trials within 18 to 24 months.

Competitors for Intellia include Editas Medicine and Crispr Therapeutics Inc. both completed their own IPOs this year. There are more to come: all with the heightened interest of investors. These companies are in a race to develop the first treatment based on gene editing.

Genome editing is going to be a hot trend to watch in 2017 and for many years to come.

Frank Magliochetti is Managing Partner for Parcae Capital.

  • North Andover, Massachusetts

This column of posts is directed at the Healthcare Industry.  Frank plans to release a new site dedicated to the industry.  He currently assists companies who are building, restructuring, transforming and resurrecting there business’s. An example of his client base are, Xenetic Biosciences , IPC Medical Corp, Just Fellowship Corp, Environmental Services Inc., Parsons Post House LLC, ClickStream Corporation as well as having a business talk radio show; The Business Architect on the URBN network.

frankmagliochetti_ParcaeCapital